cunttoday:

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Images of female sexuality abound at the fair as artists find new ways to challenge perceptions

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Sexually explicit: Ana Mendieta subverts notions of feminine beauty in this work from 1972, priced…
cunttoday:

Fighting the art establishment or creating a new one: How can we achieve equality?’
Monday, May 12thPanel Discussion: Cass Faculty of Art, Architecture and Design 17:30 -21:00 Room CE1-16Fans of Feminism invite you to discuss with Panelists: Dr Mo Throp, Helena Reckitt, Martina Mullaney,  Phoebe Collings-James and Maria Kheirkhah
 The art establishment in Britain is a hostile environment for under represented artists. Despite encouraging statistics showing a gradual rise in the number of women artists showing in galleries, we are by no means near achieving equality. This panel seeks to tackle some of the issues that women and other under represented artists face, and discuss what we can do to drive change. Should we accept compromises with the current establishment or fight for a complete overhaul? Should we push for change through our art, or does that merely marginalize us further? And how would an egalitarian art establishment look to us? What do we actually want to achieve? 

cunttoday:

Fighting the art establishment or creating a new one: How can we achieve equality?’
Monday, May 12th
Panel Discussion: Cass Faculty of Art, Architecture and Design 17:30 -21:00 Room CE1-16

Fans of Feminism invite you to discuss with Panelists: 
Dr Mo Throp, Helena Reckitt, Martina Mullaney, 
 Phoebe Collings-James and Maria Kheirkhah

 The art establishment in Britain is a hostile environment for under represented artists. Despite encouraging statistics showing a gradual rise in the number of women artists showing in galleries, we are by no means near achieving equality. This panel seeks to tackle some of the issues that women and other under represented artists face, and discuss what we can do to drive change. Should we accept compromises with the current establishment or fight for a complete overhaul? Should we push for change through our art, or does that merely marginalize us further? And how would an egalitarian art establishment look to us? What do we actually want to achieve? 

Hito Sheyerl’s, ‘A Thing Like You and Me’.

'…if identification is to go anywhere, it has to be with this material aspect of the image, with the image as thing, not as representation.'

'The subject is always already subjected. Though the position of the subject suggests a degree of control, its reality is rather one of being subjected to power relations.' 

'The struggle over representation, was based on a sharp split between these levels; here thing - there image. Here I - there it. Here subject - there object… What if the truth is neither in the represented nor in the representation? What if the truth is in its material configuration? …To participate in an image - rather than merely identify with it - could perhaps abolish this relation.' 

'Things should no longer remain passive, uncreative, and dead, but should be free to participate actively in the transformation of everyday reality.'

Hannah Wilke
What Does this Represent (pink), 1978
Hannah Wilke
What Does this Represent (pink), 1978
Hannah Wilke
I Object: Memoirs of a Sugargiver, 1977-78
Eyes Without a Face (1960) Eyes Without a Face (1960)

Eyes Without a Face (1960)

(via f-o-f-y)

Enter the NSFW world of webcam modelling with the pioneering doc maker’s incredibly frank portrait of the business, “They are badasses and they are businesswomen. How could I resist? I want to showcase that”

“If originality is a “sense of novelty and freshness” then, in the act of constructing ourselves, originality is not the goal. We construct a self-portrait, relying on existing objects – books, quotes from authors and artists, images, art – that we are more than happy to show off to others for them to use as masturbation material or for the material by which they align themselves. This is the new action painting – the curational archive. The referential self portrait. The portrait of any other artist could be readily used to explain yourself, just reblog it and caption it with “same.” The past consistently becomes the present, not through linear time, but through the constant reconstruction and relabeling of it.”

Gabby Bess in the Fanzine on Sheila Heti, the self & way more

Feels right to add this to the Tumblr archive

(via tracydimond)

(via saltmagazine)

c$ver gal

'They carried me away…' Dorothy Stratten, interview from 1980

Through a process of folding and unfolding, Myfanwy Macleod’s Dorothy series represents what Playboy founder Hugh Hefner has stated constitutes the “ideal” centerfold—one in which “a situation is suggested: the presence of someone not in the picture.”
Dorothy Stratten (1960 -1980) was “discovered” by her future husband and manager Paul Snider while working at a Dairy Queen on East Hastings Street, Vancouver. After Snider sent photos of her to Playboy, Stratten was invited to Los Angeles, where she became Playmate of the Month for August 1979, and Playmate of the Year in 1980. She subsequently became involved with filmmaker Peter Bogdonavich, and after ending her marriage, was murdered by Snider, who then committed suicide.
Her grisly death inspired Bob Fosse’s film Star 80 (1983) as well as the TV movie Death of a Centerfold: The Dorothy Stratten Story (1981). Stratten was also the subject of a book by Bogdonavich written four years after her death, titled The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten 1960-1980. In it, Bogdanovich traces the roots of the male fantasy of the innocent girl-next-door turned screen goddess and sex symbol, a fantasy repeatedly re-staged by both Hollywood and Playboy. “The book is disturbing because he talks about her in this way that is just complete fantasy about what an angel she was,” says MacLeod. “How she protected him from everything. So egomaniacal. She was 20.”
MacLeod’s Dorothy series projects the sadness of a starlet story, Dorothy was plucked from ordinary life and thrusted into the ‘high life’ as a playboy bunny. Dorothy was given a power, a power that was found in being identified as a beauty, however as Macleod’s work explores this power was only used and sadly struggled, between men. The very men that created it.  Through a process of folding and unfolding, Myfanwy Macleod’s Dorothy series represents what Playboy founder Hugh Hefner has stated constitutes the “ideal” centerfold—one in which “a situation is suggested: the presence of someone not in the picture.”
Dorothy Stratten (1960 -1980) was “discovered” by her future husband and manager Paul Snider while working at a Dairy Queen on East Hastings Street, Vancouver. After Snider sent photos of her to Playboy, Stratten was invited to Los Angeles, where she became Playmate of the Month for August 1979, and Playmate of the Year in 1980. She subsequently became involved with filmmaker Peter Bogdonavich, and after ending her marriage, was murdered by Snider, who then committed suicide.
Her grisly death inspired Bob Fosse’s film Star 80 (1983) as well as the TV movie Death of a Centerfold: The Dorothy Stratten Story (1981). Stratten was also the subject of a book by Bogdonavich written four years after her death, titled The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten 1960-1980. In it, Bogdanovich traces the roots of the male fantasy of the innocent girl-next-door turned screen goddess and sex symbol, a fantasy repeatedly re-staged by both Hollywood and Playboy. “The book is disturbing because he talks about her in this way that is just complete fantasy about what an angel she was,” says MacLeod. “How she protected him from everything. So egomaniacal. She was 20.”
MacLeod’s Dorothy series projects the sadness of a starlet story, Dorothy was plucked from ordinary life and thrusted into the ‘high life’ as a playboy bunny. Dorothy was given a power, a power that was found in being identified as a beauty, however as Macleod’s work explores this power was only used and sadly struggled, between men. The very men that created it.  Through a process of folding and unfolding, Myfanwy Macleod’s Dorothy series represents what Playboy founder Hugh Hefner has stated constitutes the “ideal” centerfold—one in which “a situation is suggested: the presence of someone not in the picture.”
Dorothy Stratten (1960 -1980) was “discovered” by her future husband and manager Paul Snider while working at a Dairy Queen on East Hastings Street, Vancouver. After Snider sent photos of her to Playboy, Stratten was invited to Los Angeles, where she became Playmate of the Month for August 1979, and Playmate of the Year in 1980. She subsequently became involved with filmmaker Peter Bogdonavich, and after ending her marriage, was murdered by Snider, who then committed suicide.
Her grisly death inspired Bob Fosse’s film Star 80 (1983) as well as the TV movie Death of a Centerfold: The Dorothy Stratten Story (1981). Stratten was also the subject of a book by Bogdonavich written four years after her death, titled The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten 1960-1980. In it, Bogdanovich traces the roots of the male fantasy of the innocent girl-next-door turned screen goddess and sex symbol, a fantasy repeatedly re-staged by both Hollywood and Playboy. “The book is disturbing because he talks about her in this way that is just complete fantasy about what an angel she was,” says MacLeod. “How she protected him from everything. So egomaniacal. She was 20.”
MacLeod’s Dorothy series projects the sadness of a starlet story, Dorothy was plucked from ordinary life and thrusted into the ‘high life’ as a playboy bunny. Dorothy was given a power, a power that was found in being identified as a beauty, however as Macleod’s work explores this power was only used and sadly struggled, between men. The very men that created it. 

Through a process of folding and unfolding, Myfanwy Macleod’s Dorothy series represents what Playboy founder Hugh Hefner has stated constitutes the “ideal” centerfold—one in which “a situation is suggested: the presence of someone not in the picture.”

Dorothy Stratten (1960 -1980) was “discovered” by her future husband and manager Paul Snider while working at a Dairy Queen on East Hastings Street, Vancouver. After Snider sent photos of her to Playboy, Stratten was invited to Los Angeles, where she became Playmate of the Month for August 1979, and Playmate of the Year in 1980. She subsequently became involved with filmmaker Peter Bogdonavich, and after ending her marriage, was murdered by Snider, who then committed suicide.

Her grisly death inspired Bob Fosse’s film Star 80 (1983) as well as the TV movie Death of a Centerfold: The Dorothy Stratten Story (1981). Stratten was also the subject of a book by Bogdonavich written four years after her death, titled The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten 1960-1980. In it, Bogdanovich traces the roots of the male fantasy of the innocent girl-next-door turned screen goddess and sex symbol, a fantasy repeatedly re-staged by both Hollywood and Playboy. “The book is disturbing because he talks about her in this way that is just complete fantasy about what an angel she was,” says MacLeod. “How she protected him from everything. So egomaniacal. She was 20.”

MacLeod’s Dorothy series projects the sadness of a starlet story, Dorothy was plucked from ordinary life and thrusted into the ‘high life’ as a playboy bunny. Dorothy was given a power, a power that was found in being identified as a beauty, however as Macleod’s work explores this power was only used and sadly struggled, between men. The very men that created it. 

Poppy Rooney, Don’t worry i’m not here long 2014

Suzanne Heintz, Life Once Removed
Life Once Removed is a sharp, witty critique on the archaic expectations of domestic bliss and fulfilment
“In my case, it seems I was missing the family component, and was suspect for that gap in my resumé as a successful woman. I thought it was high time to call this nonsense out publicly, because this notion is not just about me, nor only about women in regards to marriage. It’s about anyone whose life doesn’t look the way it ‘should.’ I’m simply trying to get people to open up their minds and quit clinging to antiquated notions of what a successful life looks like. I want people to lighten up on each other and themselves, and embrace their lives for who it has made them, with or without the Mrs., PhD. or Esq. attached.” Suzanne Heintz, Life Once Removed
Life Once Removed is a sharp, witty critique on the archaic expectations of domestic bliss and fulfilment
“In my case, it seems I was missing the family component, and was suspect for that gap in my resumé as a successful woman. I thought it was high time to call this nonsense out publicly, because this notion is not just about me, nor only about women in regards to marriage. It’s about anyone whose life doesn’t look the way it ‘should.’ I’m simply trying to get people to open up their minds and quit clinging to antiquated notions of what a successful life looks like. I want people to lighten up on each other and themselves, and embrace their lives for who it has made them, with or without the Mrs., PhD. or Esq. attached.” Suzanne Heintz, Life Once Removed
Life Once Removed is a sharp, witty critique on the archaic expectations of domestic bliss and fulfilment
“In my case, it seems I was missing the family component, and was suspect for that gap in my resumé as a successful woman. I thought it was high time to call this nonsense out publicly, because this notion is not just about me, nor only about women in regards to marriage. It’s about anyone whose life doesn’t look the way it ‘should.’ I’m simply trying to get people to open up their minds and quit clinging to antiquated notions of what a successful life looks like. I want people to lighten up on each other and themselves, and embrace their lives for who it has made them, with or without the Mrs., PhD. or Esq. attached.” Suzanne Heintz, Life Once Removed
Life Once Removed is a sharp, witty critique on the archaic expectations of domestic bliss and fulfilment
“In my case, it seems I was missing the family component, and was suspect for that gap in my resumé as a successful woman. I thought it was high time to call this nonsense out publicly, because this notion is not just about me, nor only about women in regards to marriage. It’s about anyone whose life doesn’t look the way it ‘should.’ I’m simply trying to get people to open up their minds and quit clinging to antiquated notions of what a successful life looks like. I want people to lighten up on each other and themselves, and embrace their lives for who it has made them, with or without the Mrs., PhD. or Esq. attached.” Suzanne Heintz, Life Once Removed
Life Once Removed is a sharp, witty critique on the archaic expectations of domestic bliss and fulfilment
“In my case, it seems I was missing the family component, and was suspect for that gap in my resumé as a successful woman. I thought it was high time to call this nonsense out publicly, because this notion is not just about me, nor only about women in regards to marriage. It’s about anyone whose life doesn’t look the way it ‘should.’ I’m simply trying to get people to open up their minds and quit clinging to antiquated notions of what a successful life looks like. I want people to lighten up on each other and themselves, and embrace their lives for who it has made them, with or without the Mrs., PhD. or Esq. attached.”

Suzanne Heintz, Life Once Removed

Life Once Removed is a sharp, witty critique on the archaic expectations of domestic bliss and fulfilment

“In my case, it seems I was missing the family component, and was suspect for that gap in my resumé as a successful woman. I thought it was high time to call this nonsense out publicly, because this notion is not just about me, nor only about women in regards to marriage. It’s about anyone whose life doesn’t look the way it ‘should.’ I’m simply trying to get people to open up their minds and quit clinging to antiquated notions of what a successful life looks like. I want people to lighten up on each other and themselves, and embrace their lives for who it has made them, with or without the Mrs., PhD. or Esq. attached.”

why aren’t you married yet?

Suzanne Heintz, Life Once Removed